New Release!  Cedar Hill - By Request
We have a new release of Cedar Hill's most requested songs.  This a new recording with our current band members.

Featuring: 
Pearl's Song (Pearl)
On Hobo's Wings
Echo Mountain
Heartaches and Tear Drops 
I Beg To You
Ice On The Timber
For Me It's Hello
Journey of Faith
Broke Hearts Are Real
False Hearted Love
Dusty Miller
Mary O'Grady
Pre-Order  Expect Shipping  5/22/2017
 "Miss Dixie, Tom T, and Me". It is comprised completely of brand new Miss Dixie and Tom T songs.
This Ain't No Way To Run A Railroad
Love Is A Gamble
Hound Dog From Harlan
I'll Not Stand In Your Way
Aunt Penny
The Face In The Window
They Don't Make Girls Like Ruby Anymore  
Let's Go Walking Again
Burning Down The Barn
Hillbilly Highway

This Ain't No Way To Run A Railroad
Love Is A Gamble
Hound Dog From Harlan
I'll Not Stand In Your Way
Aunt Penny
The Face In The Window
They Don't Make Girls Like Ruby Anymore
Let's Go Walking Again
Burning Down The Barn
Hillbilly Highway

Available Now 
Quantity
I've Got A Thing About Doors
“We are very excited to be able to show our appreciation for your support by making our brand new, yet to be released CD "I've Got A Thing About Doors" available to you and you only before it is released to Radio or the Record retailers. We are proud to still be with Mr. Tom T. and Miss Dixie Hall's Blue Circle Records. The title cut of the CD, "I've Got A Thing About Doors" is a brand new song written by the Great Song Writing team of Mr. Tom T. and Miss Dixie. Another very special thing to us in this CD, is that it also contains the very first ever recording of the last Song written by Mr. Jimmy Martin before his passing, in collaboration with Mr. Tom T. and Miss Dixie Hall, called "A Little Bit More". As you listen to this song it becomes so apparent that the hand and musical taste of Jimmy Martin is so in this song, you can almost hear him singing it. The catch line of the song is, "If you add a little bit to what you already got, you're gonna have a little bit more". It contains 13 Songs and as always', this CD is chocked full of brand new Cedar Hill originals and other originals by some of their favorite writers.”
I've Got A Thing About Doors
Already Gone
Cool Wind
Strobro's Ramble
A Little Bit More
Led By A Child
Tw Dollar Ring
Nails And Thorns
Lainey's Waltz
Who's Gonna Pray
With Love From Normandy
Broke Hearts Are Real
Just Wanna Write A Bluegrass Song
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Portrait of a Song - The Drasco Sessions (sold out)

Following the band’s stellar “Stories” album, this is their second release on the reputable Hay Holler label that is known for its stalwart advocacy of traditionally-based bluegrass. Recorded over a three-day period in December, 2005 at Raney Studio in Drasco, Arkansas, this album is also subtitled and referred to as “The Drasco Sessions.” Engineer Jon Raney did a fine job capturing the Cedar Hill sound, charm and mystique. While they have a distinctively traditional stamp, their music’s demeanor emphasizes originality. Thirteen of the 15 songs are new originals from Irl Hees, Frank Ray, Mel Besher, Kenny Cantrell, Darren Haverstick, and Thom Gardiner. Covers include Johnny & Jack’s lovingly profound “What About You,” and Red Allen’s “I Beg To You” in which Mel and Frank sing “On my knees I beg to you if I thought that it would do any good at all / I'd kiss the ground you walk upon / I know now that I was wrong to leave you all alone.” Cedar Hill has a knack for knowing what it takes to write great songs. Their originals have clear messages, smoothly flowing melodies, uncomplicated chord progressions, and lyrics that grab your attention. Take Frank Ray’s “Piney Ridge” and “Ozark Hills,” for example, that are also demonstrative of his songwriting development with two pieces written in 1968 and 2005. Back in 1968, Frank wrote “Piney Ridge,” and he provides the lead vocals about a place where “The tall pines grow on Piney Ridge / You can talk to the wind up there / We ain't got much on Piney Ridge / But what we got we share.” His more recent homespun composition, “Ozark Hills,” has even more and well-developed imagery with words like “From the cradle of life, many years have passed /since I sat by a campfire on a mountainside / to listen to the hounds run and the stories told / seen the diamondlike stars of an Ozark night.” Frank also wrote four other fine songs on this project. A lucky man decides to “Let it Ride” and find a fortune at the craps table based on a gypsy woman’s advice. “Gonna Have a Time” depicts an optimistic picture of that Heavenly home in Glory. Like literary works, the reverent songs about home set a stage and pull you into their stories. It’s no wonder that the band has a large legion of Missouri fans who can appreciate and relate to lyrics in the opener from Irl Hees – “Another Tear somewhere there is falling / Another heart is breaking silently for you.” Most appealling are the heartfelt and passionate sentiments that are expressed. Mel Besher and Billy Smith’s “Who Am I” assumes a devout tone as it recognizes that human frailties and weaknesses often lead one to question God’s direction. Ballads with evocative, loving or uplifting statements are some of my favorite songs. Darren Haverstick’s “Pearl” is a tale of time passing and affection of a man for his hunting dog. Thom Gardiner’s “Mary O’Grady” is another touching ballad with acoustic country flavorings that speak to the river of life, love, time and memories. Besides painting a beautiful portrait, the song is a sweet and fragrant “bouquet for the prettiest girl in town.” Gardiner also penned the album closer, “Hobo’s Wings,” a slow, reflective plea to be taken home. Kenny Cantrell’s instrumental, “McKenna’s Hoedown” is a tribute to his granddaughter, and Frank Ray’s “Black Diamond” weaves together the melodic fabric of mandolin, banjo, and fiddle. In keeping with their personalized signature sound, “Portrait of a Song” emphasizes story songs typically presented with slower to moderate tempos that allow Cedar Hill to accentuate the messages of their compelling narratives. Their songs paint pictures that dramatically describe life’s ups and downs. While life is certainly full of travails and struggles to be reckoned with, Cedar Hill doesn’t dwell on them. I’ve always appreciated Cedar Hill’s music because their messages typically resonate with consolation, inspiration, and resolve.

Joe Ross, staff writer, Bluegrass Now

Another Tear
Pearl
McKenna's Hoedown
Mary O'Grady
Let It Ride
Ozark Hills
Gonna Have A Time
I Beg To You
Four Dollar Fight
Black Diamond
Who Am I
Piney Ridge
What About You
Baker
Hobo's Wings